2015 Community Harvest Dinner

Celebrating local food and urban agriculture in Durham Region. This community driven, grassroots movement is inviting residents to join us in tasting the harvests of food gardens throughout the Region. Co-hosted by Royal Canadian Legion, Ladies Auxillary and the Foundation for Building Sustainable Communities, The Victory Garden Project. Dinner consist of Roast Beef, potatoes and a variety of fresh vegetables from the community gardens. Proceeds will be donated to the Durham Integrated Growers, for a Sustainable Community. A portion of the funds will be used to help start new gardens throughout the Region....

Local community celebrates food, fun and fellowship

Let’s celebrate Join us in celebrating the 5th Annual Community Harvest Dinner, a collaboration between the Foundation for Building Sustainable Communties and the Royal Canadian Legion, Branch, #43 Ladies Auxillary. For tickets, click here The Community Harvest Dinner is part of the Victory Garden Project which honours the past, and uses the knowledge to create solutions from a historical perspective for a current need. The dinner is a collaboration between the Royal Canadian Legion, Branch #43, Ladies Auxillary and it celebrates local food production, urban agriculture and community gardens in the Durham...

On the homefront: Soil

From the ground up Soil: a growing medium What is soil? Soil is made up of number of components such as decayed & organic matter, (which makes composting/humus), mineral & rock particles, is one of the most important elements for achieving success in the garden.  Of course, other elements such as location, water, sunlight and maintenance are also important for gardening success. Living organisms, although microscopic, work hard beneath the ground to enrich the soil producing a high quality medium for planting.  One such organism is the Earthworm, which as they burrow, they consume soil, extracting nutrients from decomposing organic matter like leaves and roots. Earthworms are vital to soil health because they transport nutrients and minerals from below to the surface via their waste, and their tunnels aerate the ground. An earthworm can eat up to one third its body weight in a day (1). Other contributing factors for quality soil is air and water. Earthworms are the most easily recognized soil organism and are viewed as a sign of soil health. New no-tillers eagerly document the increase in worm numbers as a sign of improving soil health — and they are right to make that assumption. In fact, worms are often studied as an “indicator species” for monitoring changes in soil quality(2). Types of soils: Sandy soil is made up of large particles, which allow water to drains quickly and can often take valuable nutrients with it. Clay soil is composed of very small particles,have the ability to hold water and nutrients but air cannot penetrate between these spaces, especially when they are filled with water. Poor...

History of Victory Gardens

How it began The victory garden concept began as a way to address the shortage of food in Britain during the First World War, and later, the Second World War, by encouraging people to grow their own food.  As the population embraced the ‘Dig In‘ Campaign as it came to be known, activities included canning & preserving, entrepreneurship and community kitchens.  Most importantly, the Dig In Campaign supplied the much needed education materials for planting the crops to help the gardeners meet their daily nutrient value  for ensuring healthy...