2015 Community Harvest Dinner

Celebrating local food and urban agriculture in Durham Region. This community driven, grassroots movement is inviting residents to join us in tasting the harvests of food gardens throughout the Region. Co-hosted by Royal Canadian Legion, Ladies Auxillary and the Foundation for Building Sustainable Communities, The Victory Garden Project. Dinner consist of Roast Beef, potatoes and a variety of fresh vegetables from the community gardens. Proceeds will be donated to the Durham Integrated Growers, for a Sustainable Community. A portion of the funds will be used to help start new gardens throughout the Region....

Growing food in pots & containers

Food gardens of any size can be part of a aesthetically pleasing design.  The traditional approach of a victory garden is to grow what you can maintain, which also take your time in consideration.  A modern victory garden is about how we experience the growing and nurturing from seeding to harvesting. Using pots and  lots of different types of containers can really beautify your victory garden.  Different pots and containers with different plants can give a garden a look of simple abundance.  A victory garden is all about garden design that fit your lifestyle and customize a look for you while enabling you to grow food.  Here are some ideas for growing edible herbs, in decorative vases and large flowerpots.   Some reasons to consider pots and other containers: 1) You can place them in bare spots and move them around as the garden become more lush; 2) The containers can add interest; 3) Designing the look of a container is manageable; 4) Can be elevated with a stand or wall for easier maintenance; and 5) Grouped together to create a beautiful effect Using containers for gardening is flexible and convenient, alllowing you to use different types of containers, large and small, old and vintage, wooden and metal.  Containers can help you learn and beautify you home victory...

Urban agriculture for a greener future

Wikipedia defines Urban agriculture as the practice of cultivating, processing, and distributing food in or around a village, town, or city. Urban agriculture can also involve animal husbandry, aquaculture, agroforestry, Urban beekeeping, and horticulture. More people are now living and working in urban centres, making the opportunity for growing food and raising small livestock, such as chickens and rabbits, becoming more common. It’s also exciting! There are so many ways we can incorporate food gardens as part our daily lives, and more and more, many of us are taking that option. Pots, vertical structures, fences, and overall designs can give a urban garden a unique and beautiful look. Using sustainable solutions and lots of creativity, urban farming is a good food solution for the city dwellers and is a big part of increasing a community food system. Urban agriculture has many benefits and is definitely a strategy for a future greening of the planet. Benefits of range from eating healthier, saving fuel, reducing pollution, decreasing transportation of food, greening of city spaces like parks, planting in front yards, schoolyards, rooftops, balconies, connect with the local community and the Earth itself.  Farming in urban centres is definitely a way to address climate change. On the economic side, farmers market are on the rise, youth are registering for courses and apprenticeships. Architects, Engineers and urban planners are now including food gardens in their designs for building sustainable neighbourhoods. The potential for training and education is huge, since urban agriculture is becoming an expected way of life for many people. Urban agriculture is an example of a modern victory garden. More info about...

Creating a food space

How delicious is fresh beans, lettuce, carrots, cucumbers or tomatoes? Sumptuous. Nutritious.  Creating a victory garden for today’s modern society is easy because it can take many forms, such as pots, unused space, and buckets.  One of the biggest decision is to plant something.  When designing a home victory garden, think about the overall look: colour; structures; perhaps a theme, shape and size are a few of the considerations.  Be mindful that most vegetables require at least 6 hours of sunlight. If you already have a flower garden, perhaps a few potted vegetables placed, or space between flowers, being mindful for the sunlight, water and soil conditions. Other considerations: time and budget.  There is no gain if you spend money to buy seeds, without the time to maintain the plants and enjoy the harvest. If time is an issue, you can become a member of a CSA, or support your local farmers market. The goal is to plant what you have the time to maintain. Other ideas for planting: Use pots, trellises, fences, bare spots, table, chairs, and even old iron beds to create interest, wonder and inspiration. An old ladder with pots, boots, tools can also serve as a trellis for beans, or tomatoes or both. Plant Marigolds to keep rabbits away. You can also add herbs, and edible flowers around fruit trees, berry bushes in the ground or in pots for a different look. Designing a space for food is as individual as the person designing or using it.  It doesn’t matter about the size, what matters is planting something. By looking around your garden, you can find a spot ot...

What is a victory garden

                Victory Gardens are designed to specifically address the nutrient value of food for the growing season. Victory gardens, also called war gardens or food gardens for defense, were vegetable, fruit and herb gardens which were grown at private homes and public parks.  Victory Gardens are sometimes referred to as Peace Gardens. It was emphasized to home front urbanites and suburbanites that the produce from their gardens would help to lower the price of vegetables needed by the military to feed the troops, thus saving money that could be spent elsewhere on the military They were popular during WW 1 and WW 2. to reduce the pressure on the public food supply brought on by the war effort. In addition to indirectly aiding the war effort these gardens were also considered a civil ” morale ” booster” — in that gardeners could feel empowered by their contribution of labor and rewarded by the produce grown. Production Planting of victory gardens by nearly 20 million Americans. These gardens produced up to 40 percent of all the vegetable produce being consumed nationally. Canada & US By the end of 1943, there were more than 200 000 victory gardens in Canada, producing about 550lb of produce each! One gardener in seven was a city dweller. There were 15% more home gardeners than in 1942; 24% more than 1940. The number of gardens in Vancouver, including New Westminster, Burnaby, North and West Vancouver by the end of the year was 52,000; the value of the food they produced in the 1943 season was estimated (in the dollar...